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Wednesday, May 27, 2015

How To Clean a Waterline

How to clean a waterline
How to clean a waterline
       Since interviewing the founder of Shurhold, Barry Berhoff, I have become an ardent fan of Shurhold and its products.  They’re simple, they’re functional, they work, and they have a warranted place in the market of otherwise hard-to-discern cleaning products.
       Recently, it has come out with a primer on washing your boat’s waterline – you know, that grimy, pale-green line that sits neatly just above the water, where everyone naturally looks as your otherwise-clean vessel is cruising by?
Washing a waterline is an important part of keeping a vessel in top shape, especially if it stays in the water year round. Always looking to educate boaters on the value of regular maintenance, Shurhold offers the following simple steps to keep this area clean.
       Before starting any scrubbing, owners must know what type of bottom paint they have, so they don't remove or damage it when cleaning. Users also don't want to employ any harsh chemicals that may hurt the environment.
When working from the dock or boat, owners will need a bucket filled with properly mixed boat soap, a Shurhold extension handle with a soft brush, medium brush, curved adapter and light-duty Swivel Scrubber.
Cleaning a small section at a time, the selected area should be rinsed first to soften and loosen the scum with the pressure from the hose. When scrubbing, owners must start with their softest tool and only move to stiffer brushes as needed. Shurhold's curved adapter helps reach those odd angles from both the dock and the boat.
For very soft ablative paints, owners should only use a gentle brush above the paint from side to side or use one-directional strokes down. Pulling up could bring soft paint onto the clean hull sides.
Some boaters find it best to clean the waterline from a small raft, kayak or even standing near a sand bar and doing it up close and by hand. In these situations, owners will need a spray bottle filled with properly mixed boat soap, soft brush, light duty scrub pad, Magic Eraser Sponge and suction cleat.
By the way, Magic Erasers are…drum roll please…magic.  Those are a must-have on any vessel, and are especially adept at cleaning white seat cushions, interior hull sides, and other sparkling white surfaces.
The suction cleat lets users hold on to something on the hull while scrubbing without pushing the boat away. As before, one small section should be worked at a time and sprayed with the boat soap. Then, that area can be cleaned with a horizontal scrubbing motion to loosen and get rid of the scum. Tougher areas are then easy to address with a Melamine sponge, like a Magic Eraser. Using this same motion with the sponge, owners will find that the staining and filth come right off.
Nothing looks worse than a boat cruising around with a dirty scum line. Simply hitting the waterline with nothing more than a soft brush once a week can keep the hull looking good with little to no effort.  If that’s not a plug for preventative maintenance, I don’t know what is.

www.shurhold.com for more information.
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